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20121231
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in the coming hour. a surprise in your check at the end of the week. the mess in washington leaves employers wondering how much they should with hold from your paycheck. the world, stuart was just showing you pictures of shanghai, the world already starting the celebration. the dawn of 2013. happy new year, everybody. there is a live look at shanghai, china. top of the hour. time now for stocks. >> good morning. searching for direction. not a big surprise for new year's eve. we have seen the dow down slightly. the nasdaq is up about 15. we are watching pfizer and bristol-myers squibb they just approved a stroke preventing tail. the market for this drug could be huge. 8 million worldwide have this disorder. a huge market here for the drug. it is facing some stiff competition. we are taking a look at the markets right now. bristol-myers is up slightly at the moment. dagen: thank you, diane. we will see you shortly. we are a little over 12 hours away from 2013. pc is then scramble mode. richmattson has this story. rich: significant progress in the last few hours. we have the leaders on capitol
that reflects conservative ideas. match that with the researchers in washington that to the policy work for heritage. connell: i think a lot of people will hear or read about this today and think about the conversation we have been having about the future of the republican party. does the tea party still have, you know, lindsey graham just put a statement out saying he is very disappointed that demint is leaving. the conservative movement lost a strong voice. he will do a great job at heritage. is this part of that story? >> i think senator demint believes that the republican message going into the election was a strong one. it just simply was not well articulated. i agree with senator demint. i do not believe that the republican party has to transform its position and become more moderate. take an idea like economic growth. the difference between 2% growth and 3.5% is a different like night and day. senator demint told me he started his career as a market researcher and advertising. he knows how to communicate with people. he became very frustrated sitting in the senate failing to do a
this morning. our videographer in chief. >> the washington fuel team he is representing with his hat. >> redskins hat. >> they changed their uniforms. no. it's a weird sort of -- >> did they change their name? >> not yet. >> they should change their name. >> not yet. they are playing the baltimore ravens. big game. goad up the shoreway at baltimore. >> fedex field. >> which is halfway. >> by any stretch of the imagination, fedex field is not in washington. >> no. no. no. >> it's maryland. >> they should have played right here at rfk stadium if you ask me. >> baltimore ravens begins the landover redskins. >> right. exactly. so the christmas season is upon us. i was surprised at the whitehouse the other night that the the white house all festively decorated? >> more beautiful than i remember before. i have been there for a lot of christmas parties. this year, they poured it on. it's magnificent but i was swats when i left, i said to carol the white house screes tree on the ellipse is not lit. last night was the night. the first family there with
the military option. shriver opposed this reordering of priorities, generating the observation in washington and elsewhere, quote: like the poor, we have shriver always with us, end of quote. nevertheless, between 1964 and 1968 one-third of america's poor moved upward out of poverty. by the spring of 1968, tension over the budget priorities led shriver to give up on what had become an impossible task and to take the ambassadorship to france. when the democrats met that summer in stormy chicago, shriver's name again came up for the vice presidency. in fact, he had an acceptance speech written and reservations on a flight from paris to chicago. but once again the kennedy family, still grieving from the recent death of robert, raised an objection in favor of ted. so shriver remained in paris until 1970. his success in repairing the alliance with france weakened birdies agreement about the vietnam -- by disagreement about the vietnam war, had prompted president pix son to retain him -- nixon to retain him in office. not long afterwards came the 1972 election when democratic nominee george mcgove
in washington. as you know, congress comes back today. the house gaveling into session now with legislative business starting at 10:00 a.m. the senate returns at 11:00 a.m. eastern. there are only a few hours left to get a deal done. eamon? >> you're already hearing people talk the way they talk on new year's day. a lot of people wish they could go back in time and do things differently. that's the way people are talking in washington about this fiscal cliff. feeling as if this thing suddenly got off the rails. take a listen to mitch mcconnell last night talking about the pace of the negotiations here and the frustration that he's experienced going through all of this over the weekend. take a listen. >> now, i'm concerned about the lack of urgency here. like we all know we're running out of time. this is far too much at stake for political gamesmanship. we need to protect the american families and businesses from this looming tax hike. everyone agrees that that action is necessary. >> so now all eyes are focused on the senate for 11:00 this morning when they do reconvene. there were reports
strike a deal in time? let's bring in paul cain, congressional correspondent for the "washington post" and bob franken and jared bernstein, former economic policy adviser to joe biden. that's a mouthful. jared, let's start with you. you have worked with vice president biden. as you know, he's been called on by mitch mcconnell to help with these last-minute talks. what do you think his role is now with so little time left? >> well, the vice president goes way back with senator mcconnell, and i've been in the room when they have talked, and it doesn't sound like two partisans separated by deep ideology. it sounds like guys who know how to bang out a deal. that said, if that were up to them perhaps they could get somewhere, but there are so many other forces swirling around this right now. i'm kind of in the same camp as kristen and the other political analysts we just heard from. if we are starting to hear things getting further apart rather than closer apart at this late date, i don't know that a decades old friendship between a couple of senators -- former senator and current one are
carried that message straight to washington. i remember scott telling me in our very first meeting that i couldn't count on his vote. that i'd have to earn it. i told him could do whatever he pleased and while he hasn't been here long, he certainly made his mark. i've seen a lot of politicians in my day, but few if any have been as talented as scott brown. he is a unique talent. and i have no doubt we'll see him back in washington someday in the not-too-distant future. the truth is scott's victory wasn't the first time he'd done what others thought impossible. as a young man, he knew poverty first hand, and a broken home. and even took to shoplifting to feed himself and his sister. yet scott overcame these early challenges and as is often the case, he owes a lot of it to an adult who saw his potential early on. in scott's case, that adult was judge samuel zall. when scott showed up in his chambers one day, the judge saw a troubled but decent young man who needed a friendly nudge. we had a long talk about the talent i thought he had, and i didn't want to see him squander it, judge zall lat
cliff deal. and is it mitch mcconnell to the rescue. live in washington on the 11th hour negotiations. >> and did you know about to fall off the dairy cliff? >> juliet: have you seen the prices? >> dave: as high as 8 bucks a gallon for milk. >> clayton: oak ridge boys bush. special number tribute for number 41. "fox & friends" begins right now. >> am i wrong about that don't the have a deep voice? ♪ >> oak ridge boys have been on this show many times on "fox & friends." >> good morning, everyone. >> dave: good morning. juliet huddy celebrating an early new year's eve. is it new year's eve? >> juliet: sparkly shoes and everything. i feel like we are waking up at 4:00 in the morning on saturday i better be festive. >> clayton: that's what woke me up this morning. >> juliet: this is a beautiful set it has inspired me. >> dave: it's spectacular. >> juliet: it is. >> dave: it's fiscal cliff time. couple of days away. rare i wake up and say i'm moderately optimistic but that's what the president said. you are either optimistic or you are not. the president said he is modestly optimistic a
're here all the members are in washington, ready to act. the issue is whether or not we can come to a consensus. the administration in my opinion continues to try to make offers that will get to an agreement. unfortunately, as was pointed out in your earlier report, even a million dollars seemed unacceptable to the republican conference just a few days ago. the president is not going to go there. we're not going to go there. the american people don't think we ought to go there. what the american people want to make sure is that working americans, middle class americans, don't get a tax hike tomorrow. that's been our objective. we have continually offered to vote on a bill if the republicans would put it on the floor to make sure nobody under $250,000, i mean nobody, 100% of americans on their first $250,000 of income, would not get a tax increase. >> speaking of which, congressman -- we're prepared obviously to work together to reach consensus. we know that there are going to be things in there that we probably won't agree with but that if it gets us to an agreement, that preclud
, i have to get to washington to convey the thoughts and the minds of my constituents not only the average citizens but doctors who i sat down with yesterday to ask about this question. but here's my point. now you can look at'9" globally, then i'm going to narrow it down. globally one would say that we're living longer. of course women are -- this is the actuarial genius here. you know the actuarial table you teal with. women are living longer, it's always been a tradition, etc., but the body politic is living longer maybe because they're healthier. that is not the case in the span of what we're speaking of. what we're talking about tpwhreblely or nationally are people who -- whose beginnings are different, whose lifestyles were different, now i don't know that the family farmer, and i'm not picking on that group of people, they work with their hands. of course they work with their minds, they have to have a budget, mange things work but they're in the outdoors. foresters. some would say that's a healthy lifestyle. i don't know if if -- until you walk a mile in their shoes. th
think-tanks here in washington. my reaction for the people of south carolina is you've lost a great, strong, conservative voice, someone who has championed the conservative cause and represented our state with distinction, sincerity and -- and a great deal of passion. on a personal level, i've lost my colleague and friend. jim and i've known each other for almost 20 years now and i think we've done a pretty darned good job for south carolina. at times playing the good cop, the bad cop, but always -- always trying to work together. and what differences we've had have been sincere, and that's the word i would use about senator demint. he sincerely believes in his cause. he's a -- he sincerely believes in his causes. he's a sincere voice that people in our party look to for leadership and guidance. what he's done over the last four years to build a conservative movement, to get people involved in politics, like marco rubio, who jim helped early on in his primary i just think is going to be a great legacy. from a state point of view, we have lost one of our great champions. but he and d
program of this kind. passenger rail and our states of oregon and washington has been in place since 1994 where we have partnered from the state level with amtrak, and in our state, burlington northern santa fe, in a collaborative approach to an incremental delivery of high and higher speed rail programs and service. so as we've been investing over the years, we see the implementation in the creation of a national vision as a very important part of what we are trying to deliver. we have a 460-mile corridor between eugene, oregon, and vancouver, british columbia. we have achieved in the last year up to 850 passengers, 50,000 passengers, and our growth is increasing year over year in the 10% rate. we have in our state invested over $480 million in capital and operations in amtrak cascades, which is what we call our program. but it wasn't until the recovery act came that we're able to make significant capital infrastructure improvements on the rail itself. sightings, double tracking, positive train control, all those amenities that will benefit high and higher speed rail, and more frequent s
negotiations in washington. we will show you remarks from president obama at the white house and senate majority leader harry reid and mitch mcconnell on the senate floor. first, an update on where negotiations stand after the meeting between president and congressional leaders at the white house. >> steven dennis joins us from the role call as a white house reporter. stephen, how did the meeting between the president and congressional leaders go? >> i think it was a meeting where they may be set the framework for getting a short- term deal to avert tax increases for most americans, extend unemployment benefits, and maybe take care of a few other small things. at this point, it is a race against the clock and it is up to harry reid and mitch mcconnell and the senate to see if they can have a bipartisan compromise. the president said if he cannot come up with something in the next couple days, he wants harry reid to bring a bill to the floor that would do with the president wants to do, which is tax increases, extend unemployment benefits, etcetera, at least get a vote on it. harry reid
. until then, part of our conversation on this morning's "washington journal" about the impact of medicare about the fiscal cliff negotiations. host: and here on "washington journal," we are going to continue our look that we've done over the last couple of weeks at the so-called fiscal cliff and its impact on taxes and spending and some other issues. and today we're focusing on the issue of medicare, and our guest is mary agnus carey, senior health care correspondent for the kaiser health care news. mary agnus, just as a reminder for our viewers, how is medicare funded? guest: well, medicare has part a is funded by payroll taxes, gets taken out of their checks. part b and d. part b is your outpatient service and part d is prescription drugs and it's funded by yn revenue. host: is it self-sustaining? does it pay for itself? guest: in the sense general revenues pays for it, its needs are met and then the medicare trustees says the program is funded through 2024 in part because of the reductions in the health care law to providers and here we're talking about the part a trust fund. as we kno
the details of every troop movement in afghanistan any more than americans expected george washington to publish his strategy for the battle of york town. by the same token, american citizens recognized that their government may sometimes rely on secret intelligence collection methods in order to ensure national security, ensure public safety, and they recognize that these methods often are more effective when the details, what are really the operations and methods as we characterize them under intelligence principles, remain secret. but while americans recognize that government agencies will sometimes rely on secret sources and methods to collect intelligence information, americans expect that these agencies will at all times operate within the boundaries of publicly understood law. now, i have had the honor, mr. president, to serve on the intelligence community now for over a decade. i don't take a back seat to anyone when it comes to the importance of protecting genuine , sensitive details about the work being done in the intelligence community, particularly their sources and metho
: washington, d.c, december 5, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable kirsten e. gillibrand, a senator from the state of new york, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: following leader remarks, the senate will be in a period of morning business for up to four hours. the reason for that is we've been on the defense bill for a considerable number of days, and people haven't been able to come and express their views on a number of different issues, so we're going to extend that morning business for a longer time thank normal. following morning business, about 2:00, we'll begin consideration of h.r. 6156, the russia trade bill. we hope to complete action on this that bill today. madam president, across the country, americans are lamenting that lack of progress in negotiations to avoid a massive tax increase on middle-class families -- and i really share that frustration. consider yesterday's failure, the disabilities convention at t
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)

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